Archive for the Reykjavík and other cities Category

The origins of Reykjavík

Posted on February 17, 2009 by

Reykjavík remained one of the numerous farms of Iceland until the eighteen century, when Skúli Magnússon opened a textile factory that, besides dyeing wool and making fabrics, produced also ropes. The settlement of the factory gave a burst to the community that grew and became a township in 1786. While, step by step, the governmental […]

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The birth of Reykjavik: between reality and legend

Posted on February 16, 2009 by

The legend tells that the Viking Ingólfur Arnarson was looking for new lands and arrived in front of the South coasts of Iceland on 874. Here he threw into the sea the columns of the throne, to leave the Gods the decision on where to establish the new settlement. According to the legend, the waves […]

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Reykjavík: from village to capital of Iceland

Reykjavík: from village to capital of Iceland

Posted on February 15, 2009 by

Reykjavík is the capital of Iceland. As it’s located on the 66 Northern parallel, it has the primacy to be the Northern capital of the world. Standing on the Faxa bay, at the mouth of the Elliðaár, is the biggest town of the country, but besides being a big city it managed to keep the […]

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Krísuvík

Posted on February 12, 2009 by

This site is located on the South coast of the Reykjanes peninsula, in the middle of a very active geothermal area. There are wooden footbridges that allow visitors to go around among mud hollows and solfataras, and watch the wonderful show of geysers, that even if they’re not very high, they are anyway very powerful. […]

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Garður village

Posted on February 9, 2009 by

Garður, on the Reykjanes peninsula, is the typical fishermen village, it has 1451 inhabitants. It was built on 1908, therefore last year it celebrated its first century. Its name (that literally means shore) comes from the name of a levee that farmers built to defend corn crops from the ravage of the flock of sheep. […]

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